Zawadisha

Invest in human capital. The return will amaze you.

Save $15 on tickets before September 1 for Women as Change Makers: Leading and Thriving in the 21st Century  an all-day event on October 3rd at the North Tahoe Event Center that will bring together some of the most accomplished entrepreneurs, philanthropists, and politicians from Tahoe/Truckee/Reno region.

Our featured keynote is Rayona Sharpnack, CEO of the Institute for Women’s Leadership, who has facilitated women’s leadership trainings for such Fortune 500 companies as Microsoft, Charles Schwab, and Hewlett Packard. She has also spoken about her trademarked approach to audiences at Harvard University, Stanford University School of Business, and the University of California at Berkeley’s Hass School of Business. She recently contributed to Goddess Shift: Women Leading for a Change, which also counts Michelle Obama, Suze Orman, and Oprah Winfrey among its contributing authors. 

Confirmed speakers, panels, and keynotes are featured on the attached flier and our Facebook event page, with more to be added soon. 

Meet Lauren Renda, Zawadisha’s Outreach and Global Connections Fellow. Lauren graduated from the Monterey Institute of International Studies in December 2012, obtaining a Master’s degree in International Policy with concentrations in Conflict Resolution and Human Rights. She has experience working collaboratively in ethnically, linguistically, and culturally diverse environments, with the goal to contribute to more equitable, secure and empowered societies, both globally and locally.
As a young professional, Lauren aspires to establish a connection between her field of study and the professional world, focusing on human rights, peacebuilding, conflict resolution, development, and gender studies. 
Lauren is looking forward to working with Zawadisha as a Fellow; she hopes to improve her knowledge of sustainable development and learn more about the work being done in Kenya, as well as to spread awareness about the organization, and to participate in Zawadisha’s upcoming events in her community.

Embodying Optimism, Love, and Courage

image

Between the shiny reds and the blues, colors dancing on shiny plastic beads, women sweeping the rows of gleaming plastic with skilled eyes, is a pair of eyes looking at a different place. Gazing at the shoppers—and their hair—a woman scans the entire room before choosing to slowly approach somebody with a smile and a promise. No, this isn’t competition to recruit customers to a rival store. Instead, Vera Achieng is finding women whom she could transform in her salon, in a small corridor with nothing but a mirror, washing chair, scissors, and the magic found within her hands and vision.

At 32-years-old, Vera has been running her own salon for more than eight years and has built a reputation for her talent. Commonly described to have “an air of quiet grace,” she works from 8 A.M. until dark, performing her magic on working mothers, students and children. She is simultaneously called a peaceful, wise leader in the center of her community, and a “wild woman” with the confidence to break away from traditional culture.  Behind her calm presence and strength, she dreams of expanding her business so that she is known all throughout Kenya. “I never stop because I love to do what I do” she explains.

 

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      AmazonSmile: You shop. Amazon gives to Zawadisha.

Did you know you can support Zawadisha by shopping at Amazon? By choosing us as your non-profit beneficiary, we will receive .5% of all of your eligible Amazon purchases. It’s simple:

1) Visit www.smile.amazon.com.

2) Log in.

3) Type Zawadisha into box labeled “Or pick your own charitable organization” on the bottom right hand side of the page.

4) Select Zawadisha and begin shopping!

Have questions? Send us an e-mail at hello(at)zawadisha.org. 

Thanks for supporting Zawadisha!

Will you help us win the Progress is Good Challenge? 
Zawadisha is in the running for a full feature story and video from the folks at Good. We want to win this. Bad. We’re just a bunch of little ladies, and this type of exposure would mean lots of good things for us. 
Please take three seconds to vote here. 
Repeat tomorrow, through April 18th. 
Share this link with your friends and ask them to vote too.
Thanks :)
ZoomInfo
Camera

iPhone 4S

ISO

50

Aperture

f/2.4

Exposure

1/312th

Focal Length

4mm

Will you help us win the Progress is Good Challenge

Zawadisha is in the running for a full feature story and video from the folks at Good. We want to win this. Bad. We’re just a bunch of little ladies, and this type of exposure would mean lots of good things for us. 

Please take three seconds to vote here

Repeat tomorrow, through April 18th. 

Share this link with your friends and ask them to vote too.

Thanks :)

A little something straight from Wildlife Works, one of our partners in Kenya:
"We feel honored to work in partnership with Zawadisha and support their funding of the eco-friendly projects of the two women groups. It gratifies us to see the women of Kasigau obtaining loans related to environmental conservation and we hope to continue working in close partnership with Zawadisha and the surrounding community. It is our joy to see the women of Kasigau empowered in ways that advance our environmental conservation ideologies."
Read the full story about our eco-loans and partnership here.
ZoomInfo
Camera

Canon EOS 50D

ISO

250

Aperture

f/5

Exposure

1/400th

Focal Length

40mm

A little something straight from Wildlife Worksone of our partners in Kenya:

"We feel honored to work in partnership with Zawadisha and support their funding of the eco-friendly projects of the two women groups. It gratifies us to see the women of Kasigau obtaining loans related to environmental conservation and we hope to continue working in close partnership with Zawadisha and the surrounding community. It is our joy to see the women of Kasigau empowered in ways that advance our environmental conservation ideologies."

Read the full story about our eco-loans and partnership here.

Uplifting A People And A Place

Winnie Anyango lives in a modest apartment on the outskirts of Nairobi. Concrete floors and walls are softened by brightly colored paint. Handmade doilies line her furniture, a popular way of decorating in Kenya. A corner of the living room is dedicated to her worship. Pictures of Jesus and Mary sit atop a table, holy water and rosary beads next to them awaiting one of Winnie’s daily prayers. Water runs from her sink, and although it is unsafe to drink without purification, she considers herself lucky to have such an amenity in her home.

Winnie’s modest lifestyle is not what one would expect when you consider what she has accomplished in her lifetime. The mother of eight, she was determined to give her children a better life. Winnie ensured that all of her girls and boys attended primary and secondary school. While raising her children, she was struck by the incredible violence that women faced. When a young woman was found dead on her family’s doorstep, brutally killed nearby Winnie’s home, she became emboldened by this gruesome act.  She enlisted her husband’s support and founded Dolphin Anti-Rape and AIDS Control Outreach, a Kenyan NGO that provides free self-defense training to women and girls.

Read the rest of Winnie’s story at Girls’ Globe. 

We are celebrating International Womens Day by thanking all of the people who have made Zawadisha what it is today. We are inspired by your commitment to improve the lives of women. Just look at the joy you have created! From everyone at Zawadisha, thank you! 

Malaria is one of those back-burner diseases for most people who live in the Global North. Our day-to-day lives aren’t impacted by it; in fact, in 1951, it was eradicated from the United States. When we travel to countries that are still grappling with the disease, we can pop a pill, slather on repellant, and sleep under a mosquito net. 
These images remind us, however, that for the millions of people living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia, malaria threatens not only their livelihood but their lives. More than half a million people—primarily children under five living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia—die from the disease. There also is an incredible loss of income and productivity associated with the disease—$12 billion USD alone in Africa.
Although Zawadisha provides insecticide treated mosquito nets to all of our members as a strategy to save lives, we realize that nets are not enough. We have seen first hand what happens when a family member contracts the disease. Mothers stay home to take care of children, they aren’t able run their businesses, income is diverted to pay for treatment, or worse—sometimes that isn’t enough and a life is lost. 
The problem with current approaches is that there is a lack of diversity; we are relying on a small number of tools and treatments. If one fails, it could prove to be disastrous. We need to apply the principles of resiliency to this global challenge. Rather than looking for one solution, we need many that are responsive to variances such as changes in funding, drug resistant strains, and community needs.
The good news is that there are individuals, foundations, corporations, and countries coming together as a global community around this issue. Together, we will eradicate malaria. 

Original post by dynamicafrica:

Harandane Dicko’s series ‘The Mosquito Net’:
"The Mosquito Net" is a black-and-white intimate photographic series by Malian photographer Harandane Dicko in which he uses the mosquito net, an every day object familial object in the lives of many Africans living in malaria-prone regions, and turns into a veil - an artistic tool to demonstrate the fragility of life.
ZoomInfo
Malaria is one of those back-burner diseases for most people who live in the Global North. Our day-to-day lives aren’t impacted by it; in fact, in 1951, it was eradicated from the United States. When we travel to countries that are still grappling with the disease, we can pop a pill, slather on repellant, and sleep under a mosquito net. 
These images remind us, however, that for the millions of people living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia, malaria threatens not only their livelihood but their lives. More than half a million people—primarily children under five living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia—die from the disease. There also is an incredible loss of income and productivity associated with the disease—$12 billion USD alone in Africa.
Although Zawadisha provides insecticide treated mosquito nets to all of our members as a strategy to save lives, we realize that nets are not enough. We have seen first hand what happens when a family member contracts the disease. Mothers stay home to take care of children, they aren’t able run their businesses, income is diverted to pay for treatment, or worse—sometimes that isn’t enough and a life is lost. 
The problem with current approaches is that there is a lack of diversity; we are relying on a small number of tools and treatments. If one fails, it could prove to be disastrous. We need to apply the principles of resiliency to this global challenge. Rather than looking for one solution, we need many that are responsive to variances such as changes in funding, drug resistant strains, and community needs.
The good news is that there are individuals, foundations, corporations, and countries coming together as a global community around this issue. Together, we will eradicate malaria. 

Original post by dynamicafrica:

Harandane Dicko’s series ‘The Mosquito Net’:
"The Mosquito Net" is a black-and-white intimate photographic series by Malian photographer Harandane Dicko in which he uses the mosquito net, an every day object familial object in the lives of many Africans living in malaria-prone regions, and turns into a veil - an artistic tool to demonstrate the fragility of life.
ZoomInfo
Malaria is one of those back-burner diseases for most people who live in the Global North. Our day-to-day lives aren’t impacted by it; in fact, in 1951, it was eradicated from the United States. When we travel to countries that are still grappling with the disease, we can pop a pill, slather on repellant, and sleep under a mosquito net. 
These images remind us, however, that for the millions of people living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia, malaria threatens not only their livelihood but their lives. More than half a million people—primarily children under five living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia—die from the disease. There also is an incredible loss of income and productivity associated with the disease—$12 billion USD alone in Africa.
Although Zawadisha provides insecticide treated mosquito nets to all of our members as a strategy to save lives, we realize that nets are not enough. We have seen first hand what happens when a family member contracts the disease. Mothers stay home to take care of children, they aren’t able run their businesses, income is diverted to pay for treatment, or worse—sometimes that isn’t enough and a life is lost. 
The problem with current approaches is that there is a lack of diversity; we are relying on a small number of tools and treatments. If one fails, it could prove to be disastrous. We need to apply the principles of resiliency to this global challenge. Rather than looking for one solution, we need many that are responsive to variances such as changes in funding, drug resistant strains, and community needs.
The good news is that there are individuals, foundations, corporations, and countries coming together as a global community around this issue. Together, we will eradicate malaria. 

Original post by dynamicafrica:

Harandane Dicko’s series ‘The Mosquito Net’:
"The Mosquito Net" is a black-and-white intimate photographic series by Malian photographer Harandane Dicko in which he uses the mosquito net, an every day object familial object in the lives of many Africans living in malaria-prone regions, and turns into a veil - an artistic tool to demonstrate the fragility of life.
ZoomInfo
Malaria is one of those back-burner diseases for most people who live in the Global North. Our day-to-day lives aren’t impacted by it; in fact, in 1951, it was eradicated from the United States. When we travel to countries that are still grappling with the disease, we can pop a pill, slather on repellant, and sleep under a mosquito net. 
These images remind us, however, that for the millions of people living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia, malaria threatens not only their livelihood but their lives. More than half a million people—primarily children under five living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia—die from the disease. There also is an incredible loss of income and productivity associated with the disease—$12 billion USD alone in Africa.
Although Zawadisha provides insecticide treated mosquito nets to all of our members as a strategy to save lives, we realize that nets are not enough. We have seen first hand what happens when a family member contracts the disease. Mothers stay home to take care of children, they aren’t able run their businesses, income is diverted to pay for treatment, or worse—sometimes that isn’t enough and a life is lost. 
The problem with current approaches is that there is a lack of diversity; we are relying on a small number of tools and treatments. If one fails, it could prove to be disastrous. We need to apply the principles of resiliency to this global challenge. Rather than looking for one solution, we need many that are responsive to variances such as changes in funding, drug resistant strains, and community needs.
The good news is that there are individuals, foundations, corporations, and countries coming together as a global community around this issue. Together, we will eradicate malaria. 

Original post by dynamicafrica:

Harandane Dicko’s series ‘The Mosquito Net’:
"The Mosquito Net" is a black-and-white intimate photographic series by Malian photographer Harandane Dicko in which he uses the mosquito net, an every day object familial object in the lives of many Africans living in malaria-prone regions, and turns into a veil - an artistic tool to demonstrate the fragility of life.
ZoomInfo
Malaria is one of those back-burner diseases for most people who live in the Global North. Our day-to-day lives aren’t impacted by it; in fact, in 1951, it was eradicated from the United States. When we travel to countries that are still grappling with the disease, we can pop a pill, slather on repellant, and sleep under a mosquito net. 
These images remind us, however, that for the millions of people living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia, malaria threatens not only their livelihood but their lives. More than half a million people—primarily children under five living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia—die from the disease. There also is an incredible loss of income and productivity associated with the disease—$12 billion USD alone in Africa.
Although Zawadisha provides insecticide treated mosquito nets to all of our members as a strategy to save lives, we realize that nets are not enough. We have seen first hand what happens when a family member contracts the disease. Mothers stay home to take care of children, they aren’t able run their businesses, income is diverted to pay for treatment, or worse—sometimes that isn’t enough and a life is lost. 
The problem with current approaches is that there is a lack of diversity; we are relying on a small number of tools and treatments. If one fails, it could prove to be disastrous. We need to apply the principles of resiliency to this global challenge. Rather than looking for one solution, we need many that are responsive to variances such as changes in funding, drug resistant strains, and community needs.
The good news is that there are individuals, foundations, corporations, and countries coming together as a global community around this issue. Together, we will eradicate malaria. 

Original post by dynamicafrica:

Harandane Dicko’s series ‘The Mosquito Net’:
"The Mosquito Net" is a black-and-white intimate photographic series by Malian photographer Harandane Dicko in which he uses the mosquito net, an every day object familial object in the lives of many Africans living in malaria-prone regions, and turns into a veil - an artistic tool to demonstrate the fragility of life.
ZoomInfo
Malaria is one of those back-burner diseases for most people who live in the Global North. Our day-to-day lives aren’t impacted by it; in fact, in 1951, it was eradicated from the United States. When we travel to countries that are still grappling with the disease, we can pop a pill, slather on repellant, and sleep under a mosquito net. 
These images remind us, however, that for the millions of people living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia, malaria threatens not only their livelihood but their lives. More than half a million people—primarily children under five living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia—die from the disease. There also is an incredible loss of income and productivity associated with the disease—$12 billion USD alone in Africa.
Although Zawadisha provides insecticide treated mosquito nets to all of our members as a strategy to save lives, we realize that nets are not enough. We have seen first hand what happens when a family member contracts the disease. Mothers stay home to take care of children, they aren’t able run their businesses, income is diverted to pay for treatment, or worse—sometimes that isn’t enough and a life is lost. 
The problem with current approaches is that there is a lack of diversity; we are relying on a small number of tools and treatments. If one fails, it could prove to be disastrous. We need to apply the principles of resiliency to this global challenge. Rather than looking for one solution, we need many that are responsive to variances such as changes in funding, drug resistant strains, and community needs.
The good news is that there are individuals, foundations, corporations, and countries coming together as a global community around this issue. Together, we will eradicate malaria. 

Original post by dynamicafrica:

Harandane Dicko’s series ‘The Mosquito Net’:
"The Mosquito Net" is a black-and-white intimate photographic series by Malian photographer Harandane Dicko in which he uses the mosquito net, an every day object familial object in the lives of many Africans living in malaria-prone regions, and turns into a veil - an artistic tool to demonstrate the fragility of life.
ZoomInfo
Malaria is one of those back-burner diseases for most people who live in the Global North. Our day-to-day lives aren’t impacted by it; in fact, in 1951, it was eradicated from the United States. When we travel to countries that are still grappling with the disease, we can pop a pill, slather on repellant, and sleep under a mosquito net. 
These images remind us, however, that for the millions of people living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia, malaria threatens not only their livelihood but their lives. More than half a million people—primarily children under five living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia—die from the disease. There also is an incredible loss of income and productivity associated with the disease—$12 billion USD alone in Africa.
Although Zawadisha provides insecticide treated mosquito nets to all of our members as a strategy to save lives, we realize that nets are not enough. We have seen first hand what happens when a family member contracts the disease. Mothers stay home to take care of children, they aren’t able run their businesses, income is diverted to pay for treatment, or worse—sometimes that isn’t enough and a life is lost. 
The problem with current approaches is that there is a lack of diversity; we are relying on a small number of tools and treatments. If one fails, it could prove to be disastrous. We need to apply the principles of resiliency to this global challenge. Rather than looking for one solution, we need many that are responsive to variances such as changes in funding, drug resistant strains, and community needs.
The good news is that there are individuals, foundations, corporations, and countries coming together as a global community around this issue. Together, we will eradicate malaria. 

Original post by dynamicafrica:

Harandane Dicko’s series ‘The Mosquito Net’:
"The Mosquito Net" is a black-and-white intimate photographic series by Malian photographer Harandane Dicko in which he uses the mosquito net, an every day object familial object in the lives of many Africans living in malaria-prone regions, and turns into a veil - an artistic tool to demonstrate the fragility of life.
ZoomInfo
Malaria is one of those back-burner diseases for most people who live in the Global North. Our day-to-day lives aren’t impacted by it; in fact, in 1951, it was eradicated from the United States. When we travel to countries that are still grappling with the disease, we can pop a pill, slather on repellant, and sleep under a mosquito net. 
These images remind us, however, that for the millions of people living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia, malaria threatens not only their livelihood but their lives. More than half a million people—primarily children under five living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia—die from the disease. There also is an incredible loss of income and productivity associated with the disease—$12 billion USD alone in Africa.
Although Zawadisha provides insecticide treated mosquito nets to all of our members as a strategy to save lives, we realize that nets are not enough. We have seen first hand what happens when a family member contracts the disease. Mothers stay home to take care of children, they aren’t able run their businesses, income is diverted to pay for treatment, or worse—sometimes that isn’t enough and a life is lost. 
The problem with current approaches is that there is a lack of diversity; we are relying on a small number of tools and treatments. If one fails, it could prove to be disastrous. We need to apply the principles of resiliency to this global challenge. Rather than looking for one solution, we need many that are responsive to variances such as changes in funding, drug resistant strains, and community needs.
The good news is that there are individuals, foundations, corporations, and countries coming together as a global community around this issue. Together, we will eradicate malaria. 

Original post by dynamicafrica:

Harandane Dicko’s series ‘The Mosquito Net’:
"The Mosquito Net" is a black-and-white intimate photographic series by Malian photographer Harandane Dicko in which he uses the mosquito net, an every day object familial object in the lives of many Africans living in malaria-prone regions, and turns into a veil - an artistic tool to demonstrate the fragility of life.
ZoomInfo
Malaria is one of those back-burner diseases for most people who live in the Global North. Our day-to-day lives aren’t impacted by it; in fact, in 1951, it was eradicated from the United States. When we travel to countries that are still grappling with the disease, we can pop a pill, slather on repellant, and sleep under a mosquito net. 
These images remind us, however, that for the millions of people living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia, malaria threatens not only their livelihood but their lives. More than half a million people—primarily children under five living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia—die from the disease. There also is an incredible loss of income and productivity associated with the disease—$12 billion USD alone in Africa.
Although Zawadisha provides insecticide treated mosquito nets to all of our members as a strategy to save lives, we realize that nets are not enough. We have seen first hand what happens when a family member contracts the disease. Mothers stay home to take care of children, they aren’t able run their businesses, income is diverted to pay for treatment, or worse—sometimes that isn’t enough and a life is lost. 
The problem with current approaches is that there is a lack of diversity; we are relying on a small number of tools and treatments. If one fails, it could prove to be disastrous. We need to apply the principles of resiliency to this global challenge. Rather than looking for one solution, we need many that are responsive to variances such as changes in funding, drug resistant strains, and community needs.
The good news is that there are individuals, foundations, corporations, and countries coming together as a global community around this issue. Together, we will eradicate malaria. 

Original post by dynamicafrica:

Harandane Dicko’s series ‘The Mosquito Net’:
"The Mosquito Net" is a black-and-white intimate photographic series by Malian photographer Harandane Dicko in which he uses the mosquito net, an every day object familial object in the lives of many Africans living in malaria-prone regions, and turns into a veil - an artistic tool to demonstrate the fragility of life.
ZoomInfo
Malaria is one of those back-burner diseases for most people who live in the Global North. Our day-to-day lives aren’t impacted by it; in fact, in 1951, it was eradicated from the United States. When we travel to countries that are still grappling with the disease, we can pop a pill, slather on repellant, and sleep under a mosquito net. 
These images remind us, however, that for the millions of people living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia, malaria threatens not only their livelihood but their lives. More than half a million people—primarily children under five living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia—die from the disease. There also is an incredible loss of income and productivity associated with the disease—$12 billion USD alone in Africa.
Although Zawadisha provides insecticide treated mosquito nets to all of our members as a strategy to save lives, we realize that nets are not enough. We have seen first hand what happens when a family member contracts the disease. Mothers stay home to take care of children, they aren’t able run their businesses, income is diverted to pay for treatment, or worse—sometimes that isn’t enough and a life is lost. 
The problem with current approaches is that there is a lack of diversity; we are relying on a small number of tools and treatments. If one fails, it could prove to be disastrous. We need to apply the principles of resiliency to this global challenge. Rather than looking for one solution, we need many that are responsive to variances such as changes in funding, drug resistant strains, and community needs.
The good news is that there are individuals, foundations, corporations, and countries coming together as a global community around this issue. Together, we will eradicate malaria. 

Original post by dynamicafrica:

Harandane Dicko’s series ‘The Mosquito Net’:
"The Mosquito Net" is a black-and-white intimate photographic series by Malian photographer Harandane Dicko in which he uses the mosquito net, an every day object familial object in the lives of many Africans living in malaria-prone regions, and turns into a veil - an artistic tool to demonstrate the fragility of life.
ZoomInfo

Malaria is one of those back-burner diseases for most people who live in the Global North. Our day-to-day lives aren’t impacted by it; in fact, in 1951, it was eradicated from the United States. When we travel to countries that are still grappling with the disease, we can pop a pill, slather on repellant, and sleep under a mosquito net.

These images remind us, however, that for the millions of people living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia, malaria threatens not only their livelihood but their lives. More than half a million people—primarily children under five living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia—die from the disease. There also is an incredible loss of income and productivity associated with the disease—$12 billion USD alone in Africa.

Although Zawadisha provides insecticide treated mosquito nets to all of our members as a strategy to save lives, we realize that nets are not enough. We have seen first hand what happens when a family member contracts the disease. Mothers stay home to take care of children, they aren’t able run their businesses, income is diverted to pay for treatment, or worse—sometimes that isn’t enough and a life is lost. 

The problem with current approaches is that there is a lack of diversity; we are relying on a small number of tools and treatments. If one fails, it could prove to be disastrous. We need to apply the principles of resiliency to this global challenge. Rather than looking for one solution, we need many that are responsive to variances such as changes in funding, drug resistant strains, and community needs.

The good news is that there are individuals, foundations, corporations, and countries coming together as a global community around this issue. Together, we will eradicate malaria. 

Original post by dynamicafrica:

Harandane Dicko’s series ‘The Mosquito Net’:

"The Mosquito Net" is a black-and-white intimate photographic series by Malian photographer Harandane Dicko in which he uses the mosquito net, an every day object familial object in the lives of many Africans living in malaria-prone regions, and turns into a veil - an artistic tool to demonstrate the fragility of life.