Zawadisha

Invest in human capital. The return will amaze you.

Will you help us win the Progress is Good Challenge? 
Zawadisha is in the running for a full feature story and video from the folks at Good. We want to win this. Bad. We’re just a bunch of little ladies, and this type of exposure would mean lots of good things for us. 
Please take three seconds to vote here. 
Repeat tomorrow, through April 18th. 
Share this link with your friends and ask them to vote too.
Thanks :)
ZoomInfo
Camera

iPhone 4S

ISO

50

Aperture

f/2.4

Exposure

1/312th

Focal Length

4mm

Will you help us win the Progress is Good Challenge

Zawadisha is in the running for a full feature story and video from the folks at Good. We want to win this. Bad. We’re just a bunch of little ladies, and this type of exposure would mean lots of good things for us. 

Please take three seconds to vote here

Repeat tomorrow, through April 18th. 

Share this link with your friends and ask them to vote too.

Thanks :)

A little something straight from Wildlife Works, one of our partners in Kenya:
"We feel honored to work in partnership with Zawadisha and support their funding of the eco-friendly projects of the two women groups. It gratifies us to see the women of Kasigau obtaining loans related to environmental conservation and we hope to continue working in close partnership with Zawadisha and the surrounding community. It is our joy to see the women of Kasigau empowered in ways that advance our environmental conservation ideologies."
Read the full story about our eco-loans and partnership here.
ZoomInfo
Camera

Canon EOS 50D

ISO

250

Aperture

f/5

Exposure

1/400th

Focal Length

40mm

A little something straight from Wildlife Worksone of our partners in Kenya:

"We feel honored to work in partnership with Zawadisha and support their funding of the eco-friendly projects of the two women groups. It gratifies us to see the women of Kasigau obtaining loans related to environmental conservation and we hope to continue working in close partnership with Zawadisha and the surrounding community. It is our joy to see the women of Kasigau empowered in ways that advance our environmental conservation ideologies."

Read the full story about our eco-loans and partnership here.

Uplifting A People And A Place

Winnie Anyango lives in a modest apartment on the outskirts of Nairobi. Concrete floors and walls are softened by brightly colored paint. Handmade doilies line her furniture, a popular way of decorating in Kenya. A corner of the living room is dedicated to her worship. Pictures of Jesus and Mary sit atop a table, holy water and rosary beads next to them awaiting one of Winnie’s daily prayers. Water runs from her sink, and although it is unsafe to drink without purification, she considers herself lucky to have such an amenity in her home.

Winnie’s modest lifestyle is not what one would expect when you consider what she has accomplished in her lifetime. The mother of eight, she was determined to give her children a better life. Winnie ensured that all of her girls and boys attended primary and secondary school. While raising her children, she was struck by the incredible violence that women faced. When a young woman was found dead on her family’s doorstep, brutally killed nearby Winnie’s home, she became emboldened by this gruesome act.  She enlisted her husband’s support and founded Dolphin Anti-Rape and AIDS Control Outreach, a Kenyan NGO that provides free self-defense training to women and girls.

Read the rest of Winnie’s story at Girls’ Globe. 

We are celebrating International Womens Day by thanking all of the people who have made Zawadisha what it is today. We are inspired by your commitment to improve the lives of women. Just look at the joy you have created! From everyone at Zawadisha, thank you! 

Malaria is one of those back-burner diseases for most people who live in the Global North. Our day-to-day lives aren’t impacted by it; in fact, in 1951, it was eradicated from the United States. When we travel to countries that are still grappling with the disease, we can pop a pill, slather on repellant, and sleep under a mosquito net. 
These images remind us, however, that for the millions of people living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia, malaria threatens not only their livelihood but their lives. More than half a million people—primarily children under five living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia—die from the disease. There also is an incredible loss of income and productivity associated with the disease—$12 billion USD alone in Africa.
Although Zawadisha provides insecticide treated mosquito nets to all of our members as a strategy to save lives, we realize that nets are not enough. We have seen first hand what happens when a family member contracts the disease. Mothers stay home to take care of children, they aren’t able run their businesses, income is diverted to pay for treatment, or worse—sometimes that isn’t enough and a life is lost. 
The problem with current approaches is that there is a lack of diversity; we are relying on a small number of tools and treatments. If one fails, it could prove to be disastrous. We need to apply the principles of resiliency to this global challenge. Rather than looking for one solution, we need many that are responsive to variances such as changes in funding, drug resistant strains, and community needs.
The good news is that there are individuals, foundations, corporations, and countries coming together as a global community around this issue. Together, we will eradicate malaria. 

Original post by dynamicafrica:

Harandane Dicko’s series ‘The Mosquito Net’:
"The Mosquito Net" is a black-and-white intimate photographic series by Malian photographer Harandane Dicko in which he uses the mosquito net, an every day object familial object in the lives of many Africans living in malaria-prone regions, and turns into a veil - an artistic tool to demonstrate the fragility of life.
ZoomInfo
Malaria is one of those back-burner diseases for most people who live in the Global North. Our day-to-day lives aren’t impacted by it; in fact, in 1951, it was eradicated from the United States. When we travel to countries that are still grappling with the disease, we can pop a pill, slather on repellant, and sleep under a mosquito net. 
These images remind us, however, that for the millions of people living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia, malaria threatens not only their livelihood but their lives. More than half a million people—primarily children under five living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia—die from the disease. There also is an incredible loss of income and productivity associated with the disease—$12 billion USD alone in Africa.
Although Zawadisha provides insecticide treated mosquito nets to all of our members as a strategy to save lives, we realize that nets are not enough. We have seen first hand what happens when a family member contracts the disease. Mothers stay home to take care of children, they aren’t able run their businesses, income is diverted to pay for treatment, or worse—sometimes that isn’t enough and a life is lost. 
The problem with current approaches is that there is a lack of diversity; we are relying on a small number of tools and treatments. If one fails, it could prove to be disastrous. We need to apply the principles of resiliency to this global challenge. Rather than looking for one solution, we need many that are responsive to variances such as changes in funding, drug resistant strains, and community needs.
The good news is that there are individuals, foundations, corporations, and countries coming together as a global community around this issue. Together, we will eradicate malaria. 

Original post by dynamicafrica:

Harandane Dicko’s series ‘The Mosquito Net’:
"The Mosquito Net" is a black-and-white intimate photographic series by Malian photographer Harandane Dicko in which he uses the mosquito net, an every day object familial object in the lives of many Africans living in malaria-prone regions, and turns into a veil - an artistic tool to demonstrate the fragility of life.
ZoomInfo
Malaria is one of those back-burner diseases for most people who live in the Global North. Our day-to-day lives aren’t impacted by it; in fact, in 1951, it was eradicated from the United States. When we travel to countries that are still grappling with the disease, we can pop a pill, slather on repellant, and sleep under a mosquito net. 
These images remind us, however, that for the millions of people living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia, malaria threatens not only their livelihood but their lives. More than half a million people—primarily children under five living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia—die from the disease. There also is an incredible loss of income and productivity associated with the disease—$12 billion USD alone in Africa.
Although Zawadisha provides insecticide treated mosquito nets to all of our members as a strategy to save lives, we realize that nets are not enough. We have seen first hand what happens when a family member contracts the disease. Mothers stay home to take care of children, they aren’t able run their businesses, income is diverted to pay for treatment, or worse—sometimes that isn’t enough and a life is lost. 
The problem with current approaches is that there is a lack of diversity; we are relying on a small number of tools and treatments. If one fails, it could prove to be disastrous. We need to apply the principles of resiliency to this global challenge. Rather than looking for one solution, we need many that are responsive to variances such as changes in funding, drug resistant strains, and community needs.
The good news is that there are individuals, foundations, corporations, and countries coming together as a global community around this issue. Together, we will eradicate malaria. 

Original post by dynamicafrica:

Harandane Dicko’s series ‘The Mosquito Net’:
"The Mosquito Net" is a black-and-white intimate photographic series by Malian photographer Harandane Dicko in which he uses the mosquito net, an every day object familial object in the lives of many Africans living in malaria-prone regions, and turns into a veil - an artistic tool to demonstrate the fragility of life.
ZoomInfo
Malaria is one of those back-burner diseases for most people who live in the Global North. Our day-to-day lives aren’t impacted by it; in fact, in 1951, it was eradicated from the United States. When we travel to countries that are still grappling with the disease, we can pop a pill, slather on repellant, and sleep under a mosquito net. 
These images remind us, however, that for the millions of people living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia, malaria threatens not only their livelihood but their lives. More than half a million people—primarily children under five living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia—die from the disease. There also is an incredible loss of income and productivity associated with the disease—$12 billion USD alone in Africa.
Although Zawadisha provides insecticide treated mosquito nets to all of our members as a strategy to save lives, we realize that nets are not enough. We have seen first hand what happens when a family member contracts the disease. Mothers stay home to take care of children, they aren’t able run their businesses, income is diverted to pay for treatment, or worse—sometimes that isn’t enough and a life is lost. 
The problem with current approaches is that there is a lack of diversity; we are relying on a small number of tools and treatments. If one fails, it could prove to be disastrous. We need to apply the principles of resiliency to this global challenge. Rather than looking for one solution, we need many that are responsive to variances such as changes in funding, drug resistant strains, and community needs.
The good news is that there are individuals, foundations, corporations, and countries coming together as a global community around this issue. Together, we will eradicate malaria. 

Original post by dynamicafrica:

Harandane Dicko’s series ‘The Mosquito Net’:
"The Mosquito Net" is a black-and-white intimate photographic series by Malian photographer Harandane Dicko in which he uses the mosquito net, an every day object familial object in the lives of many Africans living in malaria-prone regions, and turns into a veil - an artistic tool to demonstrate the fragility of life.
ZoomInfo
Malaria is one of those back-burner diseases for most people who live in the Global North. Our day-to-day lives aren’t impacted by it; in fact, in 1951, it was eradicated from the United States. When we travel to countries that are still grappling with the disease, we can pop a pill, slather on repellant, and sleep under a mosquito net. 
These images remind us, however, that for the millions of people living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia, malaria threatens not only their livelihood but their lives. More than half a million people—primarily children under five living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia—die from the disease. There also is an incredible loss of income and productivity associated with the disease—$12 billion USD alone in Africa.
Although Zawadisha provides insecticide treated mosquito nets to all of our members as a strategy to save lives, we realize that nets are not enough. We have seen first hand what happens when a family member contracts the disease. Mothers stay home to take care of children, they aren’t able run their businesses, income is diverted to pay for treatment, or worse—sometimes that isn’t enough and a life is lost. 
The problem with current approaches is that there is a lack of diversity; we are relying on a small number of tools and treatments. If one fails, it could prove to be disastrous. We need to apply the principles of resiliency to this global challenge. Rather than looking for one solution, we need many that are responsive to variances such as changes in funding, drug resistant strains, and community needs.
The good news is that there are individuals, foundations, corporations, and countries coming together as a global community around this issue. Together, we will eradicate malaria. 

Original post by dynamicafrica:

Harandane Dicko’s series ‘The Mosquito Net’:
"The Mosquito Net" is a black-and-white intimate photographic series by Malian photographer Harandane Dicko in which he uses the mosquito net, an every day object familial object in the lives of many Africans living in malaria-prone regions, and turns into a veil - an artistic tool to demonstrate the fragility of life.
ZoomInfo
Malaria is one of those back-burner diseases for most people who live in the Global North. Our day-to-day lives aren’t impacted by it; in fact, in 1951, it was eradicated from the United States. When we travel to countries that are still grappling with the disease, we can pop a pill, slather on repellant, and sleep under a mosquito net. 
These images remind us, however, that for the millions of people living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia, malaria threatens not only their livelihood but their lives. More than half a million people—primarily children under five living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia—die from the disease. There also is an incredible loss of income and productivity associated with the disease—$12 billion USD alone in Africa.
Although Zawadisha provides insecticide treated mosquito nets to all of our members as a strategy to save lives, we realize that nets are not enough. We have seen first hand what happens when a family member contracts the disease. Mothers stay home to take care of children, they aren’t able run their businesses, income is diverted to pay for treatment, or worse—sometimes that isn’t enough and a life is lost. 
The problem with current approaches is that there is a lack of diversity; we are relying on a small number of tools and treatments. If one fails, it could prove to be disastrous. We need to apply the principles of resiliency to this global challenge. Rather than looking for one solution, we need many that are responsive to variances such as changes in funding, drug resistant strains, and community needs.
The good news is that there are individuals, foundations, corporations, and countries coming together as a global community around this issue. Together, we will eradicate malaria. 

Original post by dynamicafrica:

Harandane Dicko’s series ‘The Mosquito Net’:
"The Mosquito Net" is a black-and-white intimate photographic series by Malian photographer Harandane Dicko in which he uses the mosquito net, an every day object familial object in the lives of many Africans living in malaria-prone regions, and turns into a veil - an artistic tool to demonstrate the fragility of life.
ZoomInfo
Malaria is one of those back-burner diseases for most people who live in the Global North. Our day-to-day lives aren’t impacted by it; in fact, in 1951, it was eradicated from the United States. When we travel to countries that are still grappling with the disease, we can pop a pill, slather on repellant, and sleep under a mosquito net. 
These images remind us, however, that for the millions of people living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia, malaria threatens not only their livelihood but their lives. More than half a million people—primarily children under five living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia—die from the disease. There also is an incredible loss of income and productivity associated with the disease—$12 billion USD alone in Africa.
Although Zawadisha provides insecticide treated mosquito nets to all of our members as a strategy to save lives, we realize that nets are not enough. We have seen first hand what happens when a family member contracts the disease. Mothers stay home to take care of children, they aren’t able run their businesses, income is diverted to pay for treatment, or worse—sometimes that isn’t enough and a life is lost. 
The problem with current approaches is that there is a lack of diversity; we are relying on a small number of tools and treatments. If one fails, it could prove to be disastrous. We need to apply the principles of resiliency to this global challenge. Rather than looking for one solution, we need many that are responsive to variances such as changes in funding, drug resistant strains, and community needs.
The good news is that there are individuals, foundations, corporations, and countries coming together as a global community around this issue. Together, we will eradicate malaria. 

Original post by dynamicafrica:

Harandane Dicko’s series ‘The Mosquito Net’:
"The Mosquito Net" is a black-and-white intimate photographic series by Malian photographer Harandane Dicko in which he uses the mosquito net, an every day object familial object in the lives of many Africans living in malaria-prone regions, and turns into a veil - an artistic tool to demonstrate the fragility of life.
ZoomInfo
Malaria is one of those back-burner diseases for most people who live in the Global North. Our day-to-day lives aren’t impacted by it; in fact, in 1951, it was eradicated from the United States. When we travel to countries that are still grappling with the disease, we can pop a pill, slather on repellant, and sleep under a mosquito net. 
These images remind us, however, that for the millions of people living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia, malaria threatens not only their livelihood but their lives. More than half a million people—primarily children under five living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia—die from the disease. There also is an incredible loss of income and productivity associated with the disease—$12 billion USD alone in Africa.
Although Zawadisha provides insecticide treated mosquito nets to all of our members as a strategy to save lives, we realize that nets are not enough. We have seen first hand what happens when a family member contracts the disease. Mothers stay home to take care of children, they aren’t able run their businesses, income is diverted to pay for treatment, or worse—sometimes that isn’t enough and a life is lost. 
The problem with current approaches is that there is a lack of diversity; we are relying on a small number of tools and treatments. If one fails, it could prove to be disastrous. We need to apply the principles of resiliency to this global challenge. Rather than looking for one solution, we need many that are responsive to variances such as changes in funding, drug resistant strains, and community needs.
The good news is that there are individuals, foundations, corporations, and countries coming together as a global community around this issue. Together, we will eradicate malaria. 

Original post by dynamicafrica:

Harandane Dicko’s series ‘The Mosquito Net’:
"The Mosquito Net" is a black-and-white intimate photographic series by Malian photographer Harandane Dicko in which he uses the mosquito net, an every day object familial object in the lives of many Africans living in malaria-prone regions, and turns into a veil - an artistic tool to demonstrate the fragility of life.
ZoomInfo
Malaria is one of those back-burner diseases for most people who live in the Global North. Our day-to-day lives aren’t impacted by it; in fact, in 1951, it was eradicated from the United States. When we travel to countries that are still grappling with the disease, we can pop a pill, slather on repellant, and sleep under a mosquito net. 
These images remind us, however, that for the millions of people living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia, malaria threatens not only their livelihood but their lives. More than half a million people—primarily children under five living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia—die from the disease. There also is an incredible loss of income and productivity associated with the disease—$12 billion USD alone in Africa.
Although Zawadisha provides insecticide treated mosquito nets to all of our members as a strategy to save lives, we realize that nets are not enough. We have seen first hand what happens when a family member contracts the disease. Mothers stay home to take care of children, they aren’t able run their businesses, income is diverted to pay for treatment, or worse—sometimes that isn’t enough and a life is lost. 
The problem with current approaches is that there is a lack of diversity; we are relying on a small number of tools and treatments. If one fails, it could prove to be disastrous. We need to apply the principles of resiliency to this global challenge. Rather than looking for one solution, we need many that are responsive to variances such as changes in funding, drug resistant strains, and community needs.
The good news is that there are individuals, foundations, corporations, and countries coming together as a global community around this issue. Together, we will eradicate malaria. 

Original post by dynamicafrica:

Harandane Dicko’s series ‘The Mosquito Net’:
"The Mosquito Net" is a black-and-white intimate photographic series by Malian photographer Harandane Dicko in which he uses the mosquito net, an every day object familial object in the lives of many Africans living in malaria-prone regions, and turns into a veil - an artistic tool to demonstrate the fragility of life.
ZoomInfo
Malaria is one of those back-burner diseases for most people who live in the Global North. Our day-to-day lives aren’t impacted by it; in fact, in 1951, it was eradicated from the United States. When we travel to countries that are still grappling with the disease, we can pop a pill, slather on repellant, and sleep under a mosquito net. 
These images remind us, however, that for the millions of people living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia, malaria threatens not only their livelihood but their lives. More than half a million people—primarily children under five living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia—die from the disease. There also is an incredible loss of income and productivity associated with the disease—$12 billion USD alone in Africa.
Although Zawadisha provides insecticide treated mosquito nets to all of our members as a strategy to save lives, we realize that nets are not enough. We have seen first hand what happens when a family member contracts the disease. Mothers stay home to take care of children, they aren’t able run their businesses, income is diverted to pay for treatment, or worse—sometimes that isn’t enough and a life is lost. 
The problem with current approaches is that there is a lack of diversity; we are relying on a small number of tools and treatments. If one fails, it could prove to be disastrous. We need to apply the principles of resiliency to this global challenge. Rather than looking for one solution, we need many that are responsive to variances such as changes in funding, drug resistant strains, and community needs.
The good news is that there are individuals, foundations, corporations, and countries coming together as a global community around this issue. Together, we will eradicate malaria. 

Original post by dynamicafrica:

Harandane Dicko’s series ‘The Mosquito Net’:
"The Mosquito Net" is a black-and-white intimate photographic series by Malian photographer Harandane Dicko in which he uses the mosquito net, an every day object familial object in the lives of many Africans living in malaria-prone regions, and turns into a veil - an artistic tool to demonstrate the fragility of life.
ZoomInfo

Malaria is one of those back-burner diseases for most people who live in the Global North. Our day-to-day lives aren’t impacted by it; in fact, in 1951, it was eradicated from the United States. When we travel to countries that are still grappling with the disease, we can pop a pill, slather on repellant, and sleep under a mosquito net.

These images remind us, however, that for the millions of people living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia, malaria threatens not only their livelihood but their lives. More than half a million people—primarily children under five living in Sub-Sahara Africa and South Asia—die from the disease. There also is an incredible loss of income and productivity associated with the disease—$12 billion USD alone in Africa.

Although Zawadisha provides insecticide treated mosquito nets to all of our members as a strategy to save lives, we realize that nets are not enough. We have seen first hand what happens when a family member contracts the disease. Mothers stay home to take care of children, they aren’t able run their businesses, income is diverted to pay for treatment, or worse—sometimes that isn’t enough and a life is lost. 

The problem with current approaches is that there is a lack of diversity; we are relying on a small number of tools and treatments. If one fails, it could prove to be disastrous. We need to apply the principles of resiliency to this global challenge. Rather than looking for one solution, we need many that are responsive to variances such as changes in funding, drug resistant strains, and community needs.

The good news is that there are individuals, foundations, corporations, and countries coming together as a global community around this issue. Together, we will eradicate malaria. 

Original post by dynamicafrica:

Harandane Dicko’s series ‘The Mosquito Net’:

"The Mosquito Net" is a black-and-white intimate photographic series by Malian photographer Harandane Dicko in which he uses the mosquito net, an every day object familial object in the lives of many Africans living in malaria-prone regions, and turns into a veil - an artistic tool to demonstrate the fragility of life.

"When I joined the group, I was down. Now I am somewhere and I can stand on my own."
A testimonial from Linette, one of our members from the Tuinuane group. Read more about our accomplishments in 2013 and what we have in store for 2014 here. 
ALWAYS LOOK FORWARD AND NEVER BACK

The African sky still black, inhabitants of a small house in Eldoret begin making soft rustling sounds that crease the night. The smell of homemade chapati confirms that is 4:00 a.m. in the morning. An hour later, the children rise, and at 5:45 a.m., the house opens its doors. A woman in a burgundy Muslim headdress and her five children appear from the lightened doorway.   

The woman’s name is Barey. In her early fourties, she has soft features that are framed by her headdress, and a straight gaze that hints at her determination. It’s 10 a.m., and she has already bathed, cooked, sent the children to school, prayed, opened her store, and has worked for a few hours. As she speaks, she oversees piles of rice, sacks of tea and other food ingredients, “all the time selling.”

Barey’s life today is very different than it was 20 years ago. Her father died when she was young—14 years old—and she was cared for by her uncle. But he wasn’t able to support her, so he arranged for her to marry a much older man. At first, she reflects, “I was not happy but you have to respect your elders. I could not say no. I told my uncle I was scared but he said since I wasn’t going to school, he needed me to go.” But shortly after the marriage, she said realized that her husband could provide for her. “My husband knew I was young. He treated me well.” But he traveled for two to three months at a time for work and she “had no one close.”

Perhaps out of a mixture of loneliness and a continued desire to help her family, Barey decided to work secretly when her husband was away, and slowly began saving money. In 2009, she gave birth to her sixth and youngest child, and managed to save 300,000 KES—about $3,400 U.S. dollars, three times the average GDP in Kenya.

Two weeks later, her husband was flown back from a trip to Sudan. Instead of spending time with his newly born child, he was admitted to a hospital for over a month. The bills piled up after extensive treatment and a long hospital. He passed away two months later. Barey, still in recovery from childbirth,  suddenly found herself a widow. And the hospital would not release her husband’s body until she paid the bill—890,000 KES in full (approximately $10,500 USD).

In what was perhaps the most trying time of her life, Barey reached out to everyone she knew. She received 100,000 KES from the husband’s family, 300,000 from his former employer, and fundraised 100,000 KES from her community. Together, with her total savings of 300,000 KES as well as a loan of 90,000 KES, she was able to receive the body.

It was difficult for her to imagine that months prior she had a committed husband, a stable financial income, and a cushion of savings. Now she had nothing but her debt and her children—whom she realized that she needed to support on her own. Determined hold on to what little of her life she has left, she first requested a small loan and began to sell lotions, perfumes, and clothing material to make dresses. She also used the loan money to pay for school fees, and stopped taking loan money as soon as two of her children graduated.

While she was selling one day, she began talking to one of her friends and loyal customers, Winnie. “Winnie was very talkative and very friendly; it was not hard to befriend her.” She learned that Winnie was the leader of the Tuinuane Group, one of Zawadisha’s lending circles, and decided to take out another loan of $60 to buy rice, tea, and other food ingredients. Switching over to selling food allowed her to stay close to her family instead of traveling far distances to attain her stock. Through financial literacy trainings, Zawadisha taught her how to use her loan to increase her profit margin by purchasing goods through a warehouse shop rather than buying small amounts daily at retail prices.

With a steadier profit margin, she was finally on the right track to slowly build her life again to support her family. “I now spend more time with my family which is so fulfilling,” Barey reflects. She is also grateful for Zawadisha, and points out that obtaining traditional loans are often impossible for women who have little education and even less collateral. Zawadisha lends to women who traditional institutions deem too risky and also employs a holistic approach that includes financial literacy and self-defense trainings, preventative healthcare, and savings incentives. “The terms and conditions of Zawadisha are fair,” she says. A simple statement, but not one made frequently about lending institutions in Kenya.  

Back at the store, she explains that as a woman in Kenya, there are moments one can truly feel vulnerable. Sometimes women have to turn to prostitution to support their families and she is proud that she never had to do such a thing to raise six children.  Life still is not easy, but it is better. She has to be strong and “always look forward and never look back.” 

~ Written by Jenny Tang, based on notes and an interview between Zawadisha board member Wendy David and Barey
ZoomInfo
ALWAYS LOOK FORWARD AND NEVER BACK

The African sky still black, inhabitants of a small house in Eldoret begin making soft rustling sounds that crease the night. The smell of homemade chapati confirms that is 4:00 a.m. in the morning. An hour later, the children rise, and at 5:45 a.m., the house opens its doors. A woman in a burgundy Muslim headdress and her five children appear from the lightened doorway.   

The woman’s name is Barey. In her early fourties, she has soft features that are framed by her headdress, and a straight gaze that hints at her determination. It’s 10 a.m., and she has already bathed, cooked, sent the children to school, prayed, opened her store, and has worked for a few hours. As she speaks, she oversees piles of rice, sacks of tea and other food ingredients, “all the time selling.”

Barey’s life today is very different than it was 20 years ago. Her father died when she was young—14 years old—and she was cared for by her uncle. But he wasn’t able to support her, so he arranged for her to marry a much older man. At first, she reflects, “I was not happy but you have to respect your elders. I could not say no. I told my uncle I was scared but he said since I wasn’t going to school, he needed me to go.” But shortly after the marriage, she said realized that her husband could provide for her. “My husband knew I was young. He treated me well.” But he traveled for two to three months at a time for work and she “had no one close.”

Perhaps out of a mixture of loneliness and a continued desire to help her family, Barey decided to work secretly when her husband was away, and slowly began saving money. In 2009, she gave birth to her sixth and youngest child, and managed to save 300,000 KES—about $3,400 U.S. dollars, three times the average GDP in Kenya.

Two weeks later, her husband was flown back from a trip to Sudan. Instead of spending time with his newly born child, he was admitted to a hospital for over a month. The bills piled up after extensive treatment and a long hospital. He passed away two months later. Barey, still in recovery from childbirth,  suddenly found herself a widow. And the hospital would not release her husband’s body until she paid the bill—890,000 KES in full (approximately $10,500 USD).

In what was perhaps the most trying time of her life, Barey reached out to everyone she knew. She received 100,000 KES from the husband’s family, 300,000 from his former employer, and fundraised 100,000 KES from her community. Together, with her total savings of 300,000 KES as well as a loan of 90,000 KES, she was able to receive the body.

It was difficult for her to imagine that months prior she had a committed husband, a stable financial income, and a cushion of savings. Now she had nothing but her debt and her children—whom she realized that she needed to support on her own. Determined hold on to what little of her life she has left, she first requested a small loan and began to sell lotions, perfumes, and clothing material to make dresses. She also used the loan money to pay for school fees, and stopped taking loan money as soon as two of her children graduated.

While she was selling one day, she began talking to one of her friends and loyal customers, Winnie. “Winnie was very talkative and very friendly; it was not hard to befriend her.” She learned that Winnie was the leader of the Tuinuane Group, one of Zawadisha’s lending circles, and decided to take out another loan of $60 to buy rice, tea, and other food ingredients. Switching over to selling food allowed her to stay close to her family instead of traveling far distances to attain her stock. Through financial literacy trainings, Zawadisha taught her how to use her loan to increase her profit margin by purchasing goods through a warehouse shop rather than buying small amounts daily at retail prices.

With a steadier profit margin, she was finally on the right track to slowly build her life again to support her family. “I now spend more time with my family which is so fulfilling,” Barey reflects. She is also grateful for Zawadisha, and points out that obtaining traditional loans are often impossible for women who have little education and even less collateral. Zawadisha lends to women who traditional institutions deem too risky and also employs a holistic approach that includes financial literacy and self-defense trainings, preventative healthcare, and savings incentives. “The terms and conditions of Zawadisha are fair,” she says. A simple statement, but not one made frequently about lending institutions in Kenya.  

Back at the store, she explains that as a woman in Kenya, there are moments one can truly feel vulnerable. Sometimes women have to turn to prostitution to support their families and she is proud that she never had to do such a thing to raise six children.  Life still is not easy, but it is better. She has to be strong and “always look forward and never look back.” 

~ Written by Jenny Tang, based on notes and an interview between Zawadisha board member Wendy David and Barey
ZoomInfo
ALWAYS LOOK FORWARD AND NEVER BACK

The African sky still black, inhabitants of a small house in Eldoret begin making soft rustling sounds that crease the night. The smell of homemade chapati confirms that is 4:00 a.m. in the morning. An hour later, the children rise, and at 5:45 a.m., the house opens its doors. A woman in a burgundy Muslim headdress and her five children appear from the lightened doorway.   

The woman’s name is Barey. In her early fourties, she has soft features that are framed by her headdress, and a straight gaze that hints at her determination. It’s 10 a.m., and she has already bathed, cooked, sent the children to school, prayed, opened her store, and has worked for a few hours. As she speaks, she oversees piles of rice, sacks of tea and other food ingredients, “all the time selling.”

Barey’s life today is very different than it was 20 years ago. Her father died when she was young—14 years old—and she was cared for by her uncle. But he wasn’t able to support her, so he arranged for her to marry a much older man. At first, she reflects, “I was not happy but you have to respect your elders. I could not say no. I told my uncle I was scared but he said since I wasn’t going to school, he needed me to go.” But shortly after the marriage, she said realized that her husband could provide for her. “My husband knew I was young. He treated me well.” But he traveled for two to three months at a time for work and she “had no one close.”

Perhaps out of a mixture of loneliness and a continued desire to help her family, Barey decided to work secretly when her husband was away, and slowly began saving money. In 2009, she gave birth to her sixth and youngest child, and managed to save 300,000 KES—about $3,400 U.S. dollars, three times the average GDP in Kenya.

Two weeks later, her husband was flown back from a trip to Sudan. Instead of spending time with his newly born child, he was admitted to a hospital for over a month. The bills piled up after extensive treatment and a long hospital. He passed away two months later. Barey, still in recovery from childbirth,  suddenly found herself a widow. And the hospital would not release her husband’s body until she paid the bill—890,000 KES in full (approximately $10,500 USD).

In what was perhaps the most trying time of her life, Barey reached out to everyone she knew. She received 100,000 KES from the husband’s family, 300,000 from his former employer, and fundraised 100,000 KES from her community. Together, with her total savings of 300,000 KES as well as a loan of 90,000 KES, she was able to receive the body.

It was difficult for her to imagine that months prior she had a committed husband, a stable financial income, and a cushion of savings. Now she had nothing but her debt and her children—whom she realized that she needed to support on her own. Determined hold on to what little of her life she has left, she first requested a small loan and began to sell lotions, perfumes, and clothing material to make dresses. She also used the loan money to pay for school fees, and stopped taking loan money as soon as two of her children graduated.

While she was selling one day, she began talking to one of her friends and loyal customers, Winnie. “Winnie was very talkative and very friendly; it was not hard to befriend her.” She learned that Winnie was the leader of the Tuinuane Group, one of Zawadisha’s lending circles, and decided to take out another loan of $60 to buy rice, tea, and other food ingredients. Switching over to selling food allowed her to stay close to her family instead of traveling far distances to attain her stock. Through financial literacy trainings, Zawadisha taught her how to use her loan to increase her profit margin by purchasing goods through a warehouse shop rather than buying small amounts daily at retail prices.

With a steadier profit margin, she was finally on the right track to slowly build her life again to support her family. “I now spend more time with my family which is so fulfilling,” Barey reflects. She is also grateful for Zawadisha, and points out that obtaining traditional loans are often impossible for women who have little education and even less collateral. Zawadisha lends to women who traditional institutions deem too risky and also employs a holistic approach that includes financial literacy and self-defense trainings, preventative healthcare, and savings incentives. “The terms and conditions of Zawadisha are fair,” she says. A simple statement, but not one made frequently about lending institutions in Kenya.  

Back at the store, she explains that as a woman in Kenya, there are moments one can truly feel vulnerable. Sometimes women have to turn to prostitution to support their families and she is proud that she never had to do such a thing to raise six children.  Life still is not easy, but it is better. She has to be strong and “always look forward and never look back.” 

~ Written by Jenny Tang, based on notes and an interview between Zawadisha board member Wendy David and Barey
ZoomInfo

ALWAYS LOOK FORWARD AND NEVER BACK

The African sky still black, inhabitants of a small house in Eldoret begin making soft rustling sounds that crease the night. The smell of homemade chapati confirms that is 4:00 a.m. in the morning. An hour later, the children rise, and at 5:45 a.m., the house opens its doors. A woman in a burgundy Muslim headdress and her five children appear from the lightened doorway.  

The woman’s name is Barey. In her early fourties, she has soft features that are framed by her headdress, and a straight gaze that hints at her determination. It’s 10 a.m., and she has already bathed, cooked, sent the children to school, prayed, opened her store, and has worked for a few hours. As she speaks, she oversees piles of rice, sacks of tea and other food ingredients, “all the time selling.”

Barey’s life today is very different than it was 20 years ago. Her father died when she was young—14 years old—and she was cared for by her uncle. But he wasn’t able to support her, so he arranged for her to marry a much older man. At first, she reflects, “I was not happy but you have to respect your elders. I could not say no. I told my uncle I was scared but he said since I wasn’t going to school, he needed me to go.” But shortly after the marriage, she said realized that her husband could provide for her. “My husband knew I was young. He treated me well.” But he traveled for two to three months at a time for work and she “had no one close.”

Perhaps out of a mixture of loneliness and a continued desire to help her family, Barey decided to work secretly when her husband was away, and slowly began saving money. In 2009, she gave birth to her sixth and youngest child, and managed to save 300,000 KES—about $3,400 U.S. dollars, three times the average GDP in Kenya.

Two weeks later, her husband was flown back from a trip to Sudan. Instead of spending time with his newly born child, he was admitted to a hospital for over a month. The bills piled up after extensive treatment and a long hospital. He passed away two months later. Barey, still in recovery from childbirth,  suddenly found herself a widow. And the hospital would not release her husband’s body until she paid the bill—890,000 KES in full (approximately $10,500 USD).

In what was perhaps the most trying time of her life, Barey reached out to everyone she knew. She received 100,000 KES from the husband’s family, 300,000 from his former employer, and fundraised 100,000 KES from her community. Together, with her total savings of 300,000 KES as well as a loan of 90,000 KES, she was able to receive the body.

It was difficult for her to imagine that months prior she had a committed husband, a stable financial income, and a cushion of savings. Now she had nothing but her debt and her children—whom she realized that she needed to support on her own. Determined hold on to what little of her life she has left, she first requested a small loan and began to sell lotions, perfumes, and clothing material to make dresses. She also used the loan money to pay for school fees, and stopped taking loan money as soon as two of her children graduated.

While she was selling one day, she began talking to one of her friends and loyal customers, Winnie. “Winnie was very talkative and very friendly; it was not hard to befriend her.” She learned that Winnie was the leader of the Tuinuane Group, one of Zawadisha’s lending circles, and decided to take out another loan of $60 to buy rice, tea, and other food ingredients. Switching over to selling food allowed her to stay close to her family instead of traveling far distances to attain her stock. Through financial literacy trainings, Zawadisha taught her how to use her loan to increase her profit margin by purchasing goods through a warehouse shop rather than buying small amounts daily at retail prices.

With a steadier profit margin, she was finally on the right track to slowly build her life again to support her family. “I now spend more time with my family which is so fulfilling,” Barey reflects. She is also grateful for Zawadisha, and points out that obtaining traditional loans are often impossible for women who have little education and even less collateral. Zawadisha lends to women who traditional institutions deem too risky and also employs a holistic approach that includes financial literacy and self-defense trainings, preventative healthcare, and savings incentives. “The terms and conditions of Zawadisha are fair,” she says. A simple statement, but not one made frequently about lending institutions in Kenya.  

Back at the store, she explains that as a woman in Kenya, there are moments one can truly feel vulnerable. Sometimes women have to turn to prostitution to support their families and she is proud that she never had to do such a thing to raise six children.  Life still is not easy, but it is better. She has to be strong and “always look forward and never look back.” 

~ Written by Jenny Tang, based on notes and an interview between Zawadisha board member Wendy David and Barey

How do you define progress? 
Constructing a hydroelectric dam could bring water to millions and generate even more in revenue for poor countries. Large-scale biofuel and cash crops could feed all of East Africa and help countries become energy dependent. But there is a price to pay for development. 
Pastoral, semi-nomadic tribes featured in these photos are being forcibly being removed by the Ethiopian government to make way for the multi-national corporations behind these development projects. Human rights violations are of an immediate concern, and future impact of these strategies are the destruction of natural ecosystems and culture heritage. 
Development focusing solely on profit is an outdated approach. It ignores the complexity of the world we live in today. Attempting to harness the power of the earth for financial gain has long-term consequences for people and the planet. We need to balance immediate economic gain with long-term impacts on the environment and local communities. 
This isn’t an issue affecting just the people of the Omo Valley. It impacts all of us. As countries around the world vie for control over natural resources,  we can expect to see more environmental degradation and displacement of native and indigenous peoples. 
We can make a difference. Strengthen the voice of the tribes of the Omo Valley by writing a letter to the Ethiopian government. Sign the petition to stop the construction of the Gibe dam. Donate to organizations who are working on the ground. Learn more about how development isn’t always progress. 

Photos by Sergio Carbajo.
ZoomInfo
How do you define progress? 
Constructing a hydroelectric dam could bring water to millions and generate even more in revenue for poor countries. Large-scale biofuel and cash crops could feed all of East Africa and help countries become energy dependent. But there is a price to pay for development. 
Pastoral, semi-nomadic tribes featured in these photos are being forcibly being removed by the Ethiopian government to make way for the multi-national corporations behind these development projects. Human rights violations are of an immediate concern, and future impact of these strategies are the destruction of natural ecosystems and culture heritage. 
Development focusing solely on profit is an outdated approach. It ignores the complexity of the world we live in today. Attempting to harness the power of the earth for financial gain has long-term consequences for people and the planet. We need to balance immediate economic gain with long-term impacts on the environment and local communities. 
This isn’t an issue affecting just the people of the Omo Valley. It impacts all of us. As countries around the world vie for control over natural resources,  we can expect to see more environmental degradation and displacement of native and indigenous peoples. 
We can make a difference. Strengthen the voice of the tribes of the Omo Valley by writing a letter to the Ethiopian government. Sign the petition to stop the construction of the Gibe dam. Donate to organizations who are working on the ground. Learn more about how development isn’t always progress. 

Photos by Sergio Carbajo.
ZoomInfo
How do you define progress? 
Constructing a hydroelectric dam could bring water to millions and generate even more in revenue for poor countries. Large-scale biofuel and cash crops could feed all of East Africa and help countries become energy dependent. But there is a price to pay for development. 
Pastoral, semi-nomadic tribes featured in these photos are being forcibly being removed by the Ethiopian government to make way for the multi-national corporations behind these development projects. Human rights violations are of an immediate concern, and future impact of these strategies are the destruction of natural ecosystems and culture heritage. 
Development focusing solely on profit is an outdated approach. It ignores the complexity of the world we live in today. Attempting to harness the power of the earth for financial gain has long-term consequences for people and the planet. We need to balance immediate economic gain with long-term impacts on the environment and local communities. 
This isn’t an issue affecting just the people of the Omo Valley. It impacts all of us. As countries around the world vie for control over natural resources,  we can expect to see more environmental degradation and displacement of native and indigenous peoples. 
We can make a difference. Strengthen the voice of the tribes of the Omo Valley by writing a letter to the Ethiopian government. Sign the petition to stop the construction of the Gibe dam. Donate to organizations who are working on the ground. Learn more about how development isn’t always progress. 

Photos by Sergio Carbajo.
ZoomInfo
How do you define progress? 
Constructing a hydroelectric dam could bring water to millions and generate even more in revenue for poor countries. Large-scale biofuel and cash crops could feed all of East Africa and help countries become energy dependent. But there is a price to pay for development. 
Pastoral, semi-nomadic tribes featured in these photos are being forcibly being removed by the Ethiopian government to make way for the multi-national corporations behind these development projects. Human rights violations are of an immediate concern, and future impact of these strategies are the destruction of natural ecosystems and culture heritage. 
Development focusing solely on profit is an outdated approach. It ignores the complexity of the world we live in today. Attempting to harness the power of the earth for financial gain has long-term consequences for people and the planet. We need to balance immediate economic gain with long-term impacts on the environment and local communities. 
This isn’t an issue affecting just the people of the Omo Valley. It impacts all of us. As countries around the world vie for control over natural resources,  we can expect to see more environmental degradation and displacement of native and indigenous peoples. 
We can make a difference. Strengthen the voice of the tribes of the Omo Valley by writing a letter to the Ethiopian government. Sign the petition to stop the construction of the Gibe dam. Donate to organizations who are working on the ground. Learn more about how development isn’t always progress. 

Photos by Sergio Carbajo.
ZoomInfo
How do you define progress? 
Constructing a hydroelectric dam could bring water to millions and generate even more in revenue for poor countries. Large-scale biofuel and cash crops could feed all of East Africa and help countries become energy dependent. But there is a price to pay for development. 
Pastoral, semi-nomadic tribes featured in these photos are being forcibly being removed by the Ethiopian government to make way for the multi-national corporations behind these development projects. Human rights violations are of an immediate concern, and future impact of these strategies are the destruction of natural ecosystems and culture heritage. 
Development focusing solely on profit is an outdated approach. It ignores the complexity of the world we live in today. Attempting to harness the power of the earth for financial gain has long-term consequences for people and the planet. We need to balance immediate economic gain with long-term impacts on the environment and local communities. 
This isn’t an issue affecting just the people of the Omo Valley. It impacts all of us. As countries around the world vie for control over natural resources,  we can expect to see more environmental degradation and displacement of native and indigenous peoples. 
We can make a difference. Strengthen the voice of the tribes of the Omo Valley by writing a letter to the Ethiopian government. Sign the petition to stop the construction of the Gibe dam. Donate to organizations who are working on the ground. Learn more about how development isn’t always progress. 

Photos by Sergio Carbajo.
ZoomInfo
How do you define progress? 
Constructing a hydroelectric dam could bring water to millions and generate even more in revenue for poor countries. Large-scale biofuel and cash crops could feed all of East Africa and help countries become energy dependent. But there is a price to pay for development. 
Pastoral, semi-nomadic tribes featured in these photos are being forcibly being removed by the Ethiopian government to make way for the multi-national corporations behind these development projects. Human rights violations are of an immediate concern, and future impact of these strategies are the destruction of natural ecosystems and culture heritage. 
Development focusing solely on profit is an outdated approach. It ignores the complexity of the world we live in today. Attempting to harness the power of the earth for financial gain has long-term consequences for people and the planet. We need to balance immediate economic gain with long-term impacts on the environment and local communities. 
This isn’t an issue affecting just the people of the Omo Valley. It impacts all of us. As countries around the world vie for control over natural resources,  we can expect to see more environmental degradation and displacement of native and indigenous peoples. 
We can make a difference. Strengthen the voice of the tribes of the Omo Valley by writing a letter to the Ethiopian government. Sign the petition to stop the construction of the Gibe dam. Donate to organizations who are working on the ground. Learn more about how development isn’t always progress. 

Photos by Sergio Carbajo.
ZoomInfo
How do you define progress? 
Constructing a hydroelectric dam could bring water to millions and generate even more in revenue for poor countries. Large-scale biofuel and cash crops could feed all of East Africa and help countries become energy dependent. But there is a price to pay for development. 
Pastoral, semi-nomadic tribes featured in these photos are being forcibly being removed by the Ethiopian government to make way for the multi-national corporations behind these development projects. Human rights violations are of an immediate concern, and future impact of these strategies are the destruction of natural ecosystems and culture heritage. 
Development focusing solely on profit is an outdated approach. It ignores the complexity of the world we live in today. Attempting to harness the power of the earth for financial gain has long-term consequences for people and the planet. We need to balance immediate economic gain with long-term impacts on the environment and local communities. 
This isn’t an issue affecting just the people of the Omo Valley. It impacts all of us. As countries around the world vie for control over natural resources,  we can expect to see more environmental degradation and displacement of native and indigenous peoples. 
We can make a difference. Strengthen the voice of the tribes of the Omo Valley by writing a letter to the Ethiopian government. Sign the petition to stop the construction of the Gibe dam. Donate to organizations who are working on the ground. Learn more about how development isn’t always progress. 

Photos by Sergio Carbajo.
ZoomInfo
How do you define progress? 
Constructing a hydroelectric dam could bring water to millions and generate even more in revenue for poor countries. Large-scale biofuel and cash crops could feed all of East Africa and help countries become energy dependent. But there is a price to pay for development. 
Pastoral, semi-nomadic tribes featured in these photos are being forcibly being removed by the Ethiopian government to make way for the multi-national corporations behind these development projects. Human rights violations are of an immediate concern, and future impact of these strategies are the destruction of natural ecosystems and culture heritage. 
Development focusing solely on profit is an outdated approach. It ignores the complexity of the world we live in today. Attempting to harness the power of the earth for financial gain has long-term consequences for people and the planet. We need to balance immediate economic gain with long-term impacts on the environment and local communities. 
This isn’t an issue affecting just the people of the Omo Valley. It impacts all of us. As countries around the world vie for control over natural resources,  we can expect to see more environmental degradation and displacement of native and indigenous peoples. 
We can make a difference. Strengthen the voice of the tribes of the Omo Valley by writing a letter to the Ethiopian government. Sign the petition to stop the construction of the Gibe dam. Donate to organizations who are working on the ground. Learn more about how development isn’t always progress. 

Photos by Sergio Carbajo.
ZoomInfo
How do you define progress? 
Constructing a hydroelectric dam could bring water to millions and generate even more in revenue for poor countries. Large-scale biofuel and cash crops could feed all of East Africa and help countries become energy dependent. But there is a price to pay for development. 
Pastoral, semi-nomadic tribes featured in these photos are being forcibly being removed by the Ethiopian government to make way for the multi-national corporations behind these development projects. Human rights violations are of an immediate concern, and future impact of these strategies are the destruction of natural ecosystems and culture heritage. 
Development focusing solely on profit is an outdated approach. It ignores the complexity of the world we live in today. Attempting to harness the power of the earth for financial gain has long-term consequences for people and the planet. We need to balance immediate economic gain with long-term impacts on the environment and local communities. 
This isn’t an issue affecting just the people of the Omo Valley. It impacts all of us. As countries around the world vie for control over natural resources,  we can expect to see more environmental degradation and displacement of native and indigenous peoples. 
We can make a difference. Strengthen the voice of the tribes of the Omo Valley by writing a letter to the Ethiopian government. Sign the petition to stop the construction of the Gibe dam. Donate to organizations who are working on the ground. Learn more about how development isn’t always progress. 

Photos by Sergio Carbajo.
ZoomInfo
How do you define progress? 
Constructing a hydroelectric dam could bring water to millions and generate even more in revenue for poor countries. Large-scale biofuel and cash crops could feed all of East Africa and help countries become energy dependent. But there is a price to pay for development. 
Pastoral, semi-nomadic tribes featured in these photos are being forcibly being removed by the Ethiopian government to make way for the multi-national corporations behind these development projects. Human rights violations are of an immediate concern, and future impact of these strategies are the destruction of natural ecosystems and culture heritage. 
Development focusing solely on profit is an outdated approach. It ignores the complexity of the world we live in today. Attempting to harness the power of the earth for financial gain has long-term consequences for people and the planet. We need to balance immediate economic gain with long-term impacts on the environment and local communities. 
This isn’t an issue affecting just the people of the Omo Valley. It impacts all of us. As countries around the world vie for control over natural resources,  we can expect to see more environmental degradation and displacement of native and indigenous peoples. 
We can make a difference. Strengthen the voice of the tribes of the Omo Valley by writing a letter to the Ethiopian government. Sign the petition to stop the construction of the Gibe dam. Donate to organizations who are working on the ground. Learn more about how development isn’t always progress. 

Photos by Sergio Carbajo.
ZoomInfo

How do you define progress? 

Constructing a hydroelectric dam could bring water to millions and generate even more in revenue for poor countries. Large-scale biofuel and cash crops could feed all of East Africa and help countries become energy dependent. But there is a price to pay for development

Pastoral, semi-nomadic tribes featured in these photos are being forcibly being removed by the Ethiopian government to make way for the multi-national corporations behind these development projects. Human rights violations are of an immediate concern, and future impact of these strategies are the destruction of natural ecosystems and culture heritage. 

Development focusing solely on profit is an outdated approach. It ignores the complexity of the world we live in today. Attempting to harness the power of the earth for financial gain has long-term consequences for people and the planet. We need to balance immediate economic gain with long-term impacts on the environment and local communities. 

This isn’t an issue affecting just the people of the Omo Valley. It impacts all of us. As countries around the world vie for control over natural resources,  we can expect to see more environmental degradation and displacement of native and indigenous peoples. 

We can make a difference. Strengthen the voice of the tribes of the Omo Valley by writing a letter to the Ethiopian government. Sign the petition to stop the construction of the Gibe dam. Donate to organizations who are working on the ground. Learn more about how development isn’t always progress. 

Photos by Sergio Carbajo.

(Source: awkwardsituationist, via africaisdonesuffering)